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The Impact of Veronica

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The Impact of Veronica was a Capcom staff blog published 5th June 2009. It is the seventh in a series of some twenty-three blogs detailing the development of the game.[1]

Transcript

The world of Resident Evil: Code Veronica also appears in Darkside Chronicles. This is one of my favorite games. You probably think that I’m just saying that, but it’s true. I guess that can’t be helped though ;-) Even though Resident Evil has so many titles in its ever expanding franchise, I still think that Code: Veronica stands out among them.



Claire was captured by Umbrella and sent to a prison on a solitary island while investigating the disappearance of her brother Chris. While planning her escape, she meets a teenage boy named Steve. The two of them learn of a sudden and mysterious biohazard outbreak on the island, and a story stitched together from madness and terror begins to unfold.


What is it that makes Code: Veronica stand out so?


When I think about it from the standpoint of a fan, I just remember the huge impact it had on me back when the game came out. Until then, the games in the series were numbered. However, Code: Veronica broke the mold and used a “codename” in its title – and a female name to boot. The title also didn’t give anything away, which only added to the game’s enjoyment. The fact that you didn’t learn what Code: Veronica actually meant until you reached the end of the game was a brilliant twist. This is the standard I want to hold Darkside Chronicles to.


The setting itself was also very different from that of other games in the series. Code: Veronica got away from the Raccoon City setting. It started out on a solitary island in the distant sea below the equator, and then moved even further south to Antarctica. No game in the series had ever experienced such a dramatic change of scenery. It broke the pattern of having a story start and finish in one place, and it put the player in a completely different world at the end of the game than the one they were in at the beginning.


I think that Code: Veronica was created to go against everything that had come before in the Resident Evil series.


I didn’t just want to bring that game to Darkside Chronicles, I wanted to everything that made it great! I wanted to give additional meaning to that story and to more closely knit it together with Resident Evil 2. I found that it wasn’t so difficult once I dissected both of them.


Code: Veronica itself is already on the darker side of the Resident Evil series. Its story is more emotional, more insane: Steve’s crush on Claire, the life-and-death struggles in a place all but forgotten by the rest of the world, and families on the verge of falling apart – Steve’s family and the insane Ashford family. These are stories that you can’t just chart on a timeline.


Including Code: Veronica in Darkside Chronicles was, in a way, inevitable.


■Yasuhiro Seto’s Profile
Lives in Osaka, but doesn't speak the local Osaka dialect.
Has directed titles such as RE: Umbrella Chronicles and Beat Down.
A fan of horror movies, especially the unforgettable masterpiece, "Phenomena."
He enjoyed it so much that he decided to use the band Goblin in the score.

Sources

  1. RESIDENT EVIL / The Darkside Chronicles TALING EVIL. Archived from the original on 2009-10-31.

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